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As a full-time livestreamer, Jun eats, cooks, raps, and cracks jokes live online to make a living on an app called BeLive. While people question his career choices, he wants to be taken seriously.


Transcript:

I see livestreaming as a full-time career. If you’re entertaining enough, you can easily earn about S$1,500 to S$3,000 a month [US$1,100 to $2,200]. Livestreaming is one of the biggest networks that you can get to get the fastest exposure out there, to get our name out there.

Hi, guys. My name is Jun and I’m a livestreamer with 20,000 followers.

The normal, general audience thinks streamers in Singapore are quite narcissistic. They think that we enjoy seeing ourselves in front of camera, we have that kind of vain side and everything. But another misconception is that they think we’re streaming because we don’t have much to do in life. We’re just too free, too good for nothing so that’s why we’re in front of camera. But the fact is that I’ve realised as time passed the more exclusive content that we bring out, people start to realise that this is something that we take seriously.

I tried so hard. Even after my second stream, my third stream, there was still no one there. It made me feel as if I’m looking in the mirror. That is when I started questioning myself. Is it really because I’m not entertaining? And it’s that slight self-esteem which just drops slowly.

I just kept on telling myself that, come on, the world is huge. I mean, you have 7 billion people in the world already, there’s bound to be at least 10 people you can satisfy if you keep on trying. I decided what else can I do to actually make myself more interactive with the viewers out there.

So that was when I did a McDonald’s stream. I wanted my viewers to choose my burger for me. All of sudden from having 70 viewers, it started booming up by 600. It became a double McSpicy with an extra patty, which was three patties, extra cheese – and that day I clearly remember my McSpicy cost S$32.70 [US$24] for a single burger. And then after they were all like, “Please eat it on camera. Show us how it tastes. Tell us!” I realised, oh my god, these people do want to know. And I think that’s when everything started booming from there.

The highest number I’ve ever reached in one stream was in an around a two-hour stream I reached 70,000 viewers. If you’re entertaining, you receive gifts which you can cash out to real- time cash. These gifts can range from the smallest one where it can be 50 cents per gift and it can range all the way up to at least S$80 to S$100 dollars [US$75] for a single gift. For me in the popular zone, it’s safe to say that if you’re entertaining enough, on a single stream I earn around S$200 to S$300 dollars worth [US$150 to $225].

Jun is still very sad and single. Oh my god… Oh my god! Thank you!

I think my viewers send the gifts because I tend to stay very authentic with the content that I produce towards them.

Livestreaming is spontaneous – nothing is scripted. And then your viewers are in there with you to interact with you. They want to know that you’re noticing them. They want to hear the answers from the questions that they’re asking you. These comments can range from general comments all the way to very personal. There are a few comments that do strike you deep in your heart.

Haters, I think they do exist in any social media platform. You cannot please everyone in the world. And for me, of course, livestreaming is a bit harder because these haters are with you real-time. The worst I’ve had was there were rumours spreading. For example that Jun is not a Korean. He’s someone acting like a Korean so that he can get all the girls in the streaming network. That house he’s living in is not his house. He actually can’t even afford anything.

All these kind of rumours to make you sound like you’re a low-life person – and of course, at first I tried defending myself. But I realised that that is not the best solution. Because the more you defend yourself, they give more and more hate and these rumours get more and more worse.

The biggest surprise is that once my whole audience even plus the haters started to grow, when a hateful comment came in, my viewers will actually protect me.

Due to the fanbase that’s increasing, when I went to watch a movie in Tampines down at the mall, enjoying my movie, I came out and realised that there were these two girls who were waiting for me till my movie ended. They came, ran over to me and said, “Hi Jun! I really really like your streams.” And they printed out these two Polaroids of my profile picture and asked me to sign for them.

I feel grateful for that because it shows that these people do have that much interest in me. It gives me that motivation to do better for them.

I treat my viewers like friends and family. Without them, I wouldn’t be the person that I am today. Without livestreaming, I really wouldn’t have been able to discover my capabilities and what I’m able to do.

This post Video: For this guy, livestreaming is life (and serious business) appeared first on Tech in Asia.

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